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Friday, October 28, 2016

The "The Correct Way To Make Tomato Soup" Story

It was an ordinary day.  Pulled out a can of Campbell's Tomato soup from the pantry, grabbed the tab on the top to remove it, scrapped the contents into a sauce pan and added a can of milk.  Sound like what you would do when making a bowl of tomato soup for lunch.  There have been many times when I just used water instead of milk, but when I wanted a bowl of tomato soup that was creamy and with more body, I used the milk.  
Campbell's soup wagons getting ready to make deliveries.
Last couple of years the milk has become no-fat milk, but the soup still seems to have more body than when made with water.  Now, I realize that you can buy Campbell's Tomato soup with other items in the soup such as tomato pieces or even rice.  Still doesn't matter to me.  As long as it is a creamy red color, it is going to be good.  Mom made Campbell's soup for me when I was a kid and I still love the stuff.  Grab a few Keebler Original Club Crackers, snap them in half and drop them in the soup and your meal is complete.  
One of the Campbell Soup Kids.
I recently got an email from The Brickerville Diner and Silver Spring Diner that featured a story titled "From Soup To Nuts."  Story was about the Campbell Company and how it all began.  Started in 1869 by Joseph A. Campbell, a fruit merchant and Abraham Anderson, a box manufacturer.  They sold vegetables, jellies, minced meats, condiments and canned soup in New Jersey.  Anderson left the partnership in 1876 and in 1897 John T. Torrance, nephew of the company's general manager, Arthur, began working  for the company. John was a chemist who was responsible for developing a viable method for condensing soup by halving soups heaviest ingredient: water.  John eventually became the company President from 1914 to 1930 and buying out the Campbell family.  
Another Campbell Soup Kid.
In 1898, Herberton Williams, a company executive, had the company adopt the carnelian red and bright white color scheme that still graces their cans.  Since the company began advertising, they have marketed the product to appeal to children.  It was in 1905 that the Campbell Soup Kids first appeared.  Grace Drayton, staff artist for the Philadelphia Press and Evening Journal, was the illustrator for the Campbell artwork.  
1964 Andy Warhol artwork.
Over the years there were approximately 16 different kids who were depicted.  Their pictures were everywhere from the sides of streetcars to magazine ads.  The faces of the kids also were found on children's dolls, on clocks and cookbooks as well as on mugs, napkins, playing cards, toys, watches, t-shirts and the list goes on and on.  Perhaps you might have seen a product with a Campbell's kid on it if you travel to antique markets.  Campbell's Soup has also been featured in artwork, specifically work done by Andy Warhol. As for me, I still enjoy a nice hot bowl of Campbell's tomato soup with a few Club crackers in it.  Doesn't matter what time of the year, it still reminds me of good times from the past.  It was another extraordinary day in the life of an ordinary guy.

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