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Sunday, November 13, 2016

The "Framing A Piece Of History" Story

It was an ordinary day.  Reading a few of the articles in the Illinois Journal newspaper laying in front of me on the framing counter at Grebinger Gallery in Neffsville, PA.  Newspaper is dated May 4, 1865, approximately two weeks after President Abraham Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C.  The attack on Lincoln came five days after Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered his massive army at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, effectively ending the American Civil War.  The Illinois Journal is printed in Springfield, Illinois where Lincoln was a lawyer and elected to the Illinois House of Representative and eventually elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1846,  and then to the Presidency of the United States on November 6, 1860.  The newspaper was brought in to the Gallery for framing after the owner of the newspaper saw a similar historic newspaper framed and hanging in the gallery as a sample.  On the front page of the paper folio is one brief story printed under "Afternoon Dispatches" which tells of Secretary of State William H. Seward being seriously wounded by Booth's conspirator Lewis Powell during the assassination plot that killed Lincoln.  Newspaper looked as if it had been folded and in storage for years.  Many of the creases were beyond being straightened without the chance of destroying the newspaper. At times I can use a heating press to remove these creases, but this one is beyond total restoration. I was given the job of framing the paper, showing only the front of the newspaper.  Loved reading the articles and advertisements that were placed on the front page of the paper.  Follow along with me as I frame the historic newspaper using all acid-free and conservation materials to help preserve the newspaper forever.  It was another extraordinary day in the life of an ordinary guy. 
Newspaper laying on board for inspection and preparation for framing.
Date can be seen in this photo.
Short notice about Secretary Seward attempted assassination.
I have cut the mat and cut a piece of conservation backing for framig.
Position the paper on the foam and use acid-free paper adhesive clips to hold it in place.
I used the underpinner to make the frame.
Frame, Museum glass, and matted job ready for assembly.
The driver is used to hold the project in place.
Tape is placed along the edges to hold the dust cover in place.
Stretching the paper dust cover on the rear of the frame.
Trim excess paper from the edges. 
In this case I used Wall-Buddies to allow for hanging.
Final result.  Acid free and conservation materials used for maximum preservation.
  

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